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Library » Creating a Works Cited list using the 8th edition

Creating a Works Cited list using the 8th edition

Creating a Works Cited list using the 8th edition

 

List of core elements – they should be listed in the following order:

 

  1. Author.
  2. “Title of source.”
  3. Title of container,            *Each element on the left should be
  4. Other contributors,            followed by the punctuation mark shown*
  5. Version,
  6. Number,
  7. Publisher,
  8. Publication date,
  9. Location.

 

  • Author: Begin the entry with the author’s last name, followed by a comma and the rest of the End this element with a period.

 

Smith, Edward.

Smith, Edward, and Neal Lerner. (two authors)

                   Smith, Edward, et al. (three or more authors)

                     Smith, Edward, editor. (use editor when no author is given)

                   British History Association. (corporate author or organization)

     *Note: When an organization is both author and publisher of a work, the organization’s

                name is now given only once, as the publisher.  No author is stated.

 

  • Title of Source: After the author, the next element is the title of the source. A title is placed in "quotation marks" if the source is part of a larger work (article title, episode, song, poem, etc.) A title is italicized if the source is self-contained and independent (book, a collection, encyclopedia, website, etc.)

 

Smith, Edward. “Queen Victoria.” Encyclopedia Britannica, edited by Richard Howard,

          3rd ed., vol. 6, no. 2, Museum of British History, 2005, pp. 74-78.

 

Joyce, Michael. Othermindedness: The Emergence of Network Culture. U of Michigan

P, 2000, p. 42.

 

  • Title of Container: If the source is part of a larger whole, the larger whole is considered the container that holds the source. For example, if you want to cite an article in an encyclopedia, the article is the source, and the name of the encyclopedia is the container. The title of the container is italicized and followed by a comma.

 

Smith, Edward. “Queen Victoria.” Encyclopedia Britannica, edited by Richard Howard,

          3rd ed., vol. 6, no. 2, Museum of British History, 2005, pp. 74-78.

 

Hollmichel, Stefanie. "The Reading Brain." So Many Books, 25 Apr. 2013,

          somanybooks.com/2013/04/25/the-reading-brain-differences-between-

digital-and-print/.

 

*Note: A container can sometimes be nested in a larger container. Add core elements

           3-9 (from "Title of container" to "Location") to the end of the entry to account

           for each additional container.

 

Goldman, Anne. "Questions of Transport: Reading Primo Levi Reading Dante." The

Georgia Review, vol. 64, no. 1, 2010, pp. 69-88. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/ stable/41403188.

 

 

 

  • Other Contributors: In addition to the author, there may be other contributors to the source who should be credited, such as editors, illustrators, translators, narrator, etc. If the contributions are relevant to your research, or necessary to identify the source, include their names in your documentation.

 

Smith, Edward. “Queen Victoria.” Encyclopedia Britannica, edited by Richard Howard,

          3rd ed., vol. 6, no. 2, Museum of British History, 2005, pp. 74-78.

 

  • Version: If a source is listed as an edition or version of a work, include it in your citation.

 

Smith, Edward. “Queen Victoria.” Encyclopedia Britannica, edited by Richard Howard,

          3rd ed., vol. 6, no. 2, Museum of British History, 2005, pp. 74-78.

 

  • Number: If a source is part of a numbered sequence, such as a multi-volume book, or journal with both volume and issue numbers, those numbers must be listed in your citation.

 

Smith, Edward. “Queen Victoria.” Encyclopedia Britannica, edited by Richard Howard,                    3rd ed., vol. 6, no. 2, Museum of British History, 2005, pp. 74-78.

 

  • Publisher: The publisher is the organization primarily responsible for producing the source or making it available to the public.

 

Smith, Edward. “Queen Victoria.” Encyclopedia Britannica, edited by Richard Howard,

          3rd ed., vol. 6, no. 2, Museum of British History, 2005, pp. 74-78.

 

  • Publication Date: The same source may have been published on more than one date, such as an online version of an original source. When the source has more than one date, it is sufficient to use the date that is most relevant to your use of it. If you’re unsure about which date to use, go with the date of the source’s original publication.

 

Smith, Edward. “Queen Victoria.” Encyclopedia Britannica, edited by Richard Howard,

          3rd ed., vol. 6, no. 2, Museum of British History, 2005, pp. 74-78.

 

  • Location: You should be as specific as possible in identifying a work’s location. For print sources, include a page number (p.) or a range of page numbers (pp.) The location of an online work is indicated by its URL.

 

Smith, Edward. “Queen Victoria.” Encyclopedia Britannica, edited by Richard Howard,

          3rd ed., vol. 6, no. 2, Museum of British History, 2005, pp. 74-78.

 

Wheelis, Mark. "Investigating Disease Outbreaks Under a Protocol to the Biological and

Toxin Weapons Convention." Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 6, no. 6, 2000,

www.nc.cdc.gov/eid/article/6/6/00-0607_article. Accessed 8 Feb. 2009.

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Optional: Access date (electronic sources)

Wheelis, Mark. "Investigating Disease Outbreaks Under a Protocol to the Biological and

          Toxin Weapons Convention." Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 6, 2000,

  1. 595-600, wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/article. Accessed 8 Feb. 2009.

 

Optional: City of publication: The city in which a publisher is located is only necessary in particular instances, such as in a work published before 1900. Since pre-1900 works were usually associated with the city in which they were published.      

Thoreau, Henry David. ExcursionsBoston, 1863.

 

Note: When writing dates on your works cited, abbreviate all months except May, June, July.

         Write date as follows: Day Month Year

                                         25 Oct. 1975

                                           5 May 1970